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When the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) came kneeling asking for dialogue with the Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) that dragged it to court over abuse of public institutions, we knew that it was a spurious offer of a sham compromise. It was a desperate and tactical farce to evade the sharp fangs of the law. We have been vindicated.

The DPP, for all it is, has never believed in the word dialogue even when it fully knows it has done something wrong. The party is well known for its militant approach and arrogant reaction to issues. So, it was pretty obvious that the offer for dialogue was not in good faith considering that this is a party whose well highlighted words in its lexicon are zachamba, nonsense and stupid.

We were also not surprised when the party decided to fail the second meeting with the CSOs on the flimsy excuse that Secretary General Gresselder Jeffrey was under the weather. We believe that the DPP is more than Jeffrey and there are senior members in its hierarchy that could have sat in for the purportedly ill Secretary General. We do not want to have an impression that DPP kicks with the same breath as Jeffrey.

The CSOs should have taken heed of our generous advice to proceed with their initial stance of instituting court proceedings. After all, our courts have a good reputation and are better placed to decide who is wrong or right.

Much as the decision to cancel the talks has come from the CSOs and the DPP wants to sound surprised, the truth is that the DPP was never impressed with the pressure from the CSOs and did not want the dialogue. Now it has been given the opportunity to claim innocence.

But now that the CSOs have finally realised that it is pointless and futile to discuss with a grouping that celebrates its staggering recalcitrance, we pray that the wheels of justice will roll.

As we said in one of our earlier editions, our interest as an organisation that stands for Malawians is to see the logical conclusion of this matter. We believe that this case will set precedence to the separation of political parties and the government. May justice prevail.



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